Highlighted results

2.6 million people with access to renewable energy

1.1 million hectares of forest under sustainable management

754,000 farming businesses more resilient to climate change

2.4 million people living in better-managed river basins

Additional sources

Theory of Change Climate

Download the PDF document Theory of Change for Climate (autumn 2018)

Video on international climate action Netherlands

Watch this short video on international climate action by the Netherlands

Introduction

The consequences of climate change are becoming increasingly serious. The poorest people are often the hardest hit and, among them, women in particular. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will only be achieved if everyone worldwide works together to limit climate change. That is why 197 countries signed the Paris Climate Agreement in 2015.

In this agreement, countries agreed to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius and preferably 1.5 degrees. They also identified the need to adapt to the effects of climate change. Wealthy countries committed to helping developing countries in this respect.

These objectives mean that countries have to change their way of working and investing in many areas. The Netherlands supports developing countries in those areas in which it can make the biggest difference given its knowledge, expertise and role in the world. These include access to renewable energy, combating deforestation, climate-smart agriculture and climate-resilient use and management of water. In order to achieve good results, the Netherlands works with multilateral organisations, NGOs, knowledge institutes and the business community.

In climate negotiations, the Netherlands will continue to press for the proper implementation of the measures agreed in the Paris Climate Agreement. This serves the interests of both the Netherlands and developing countries.

Results 2018

Climate change is caused by a higher concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The world has not yet succeeded in stabilising these, although much has been achieved. Without global action to limit climate change, the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere would have risen even further and the climate would have changed even more.

The Netherlands funds renewable energy projects in developing countries. Thanks to these projects, developing countries already emit 3.1 million tonnes less of CO2 annually and, since 2015, 7.2 million people have gained access to renewable energy.

The Netherlands is also helping to combat deforestation in developing countries. This is important because forests collect CO2 from the atmosphere, helping to stabilise the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In this reporting period, 1,198,534 hectares of forestland were better and more sustainably managed.

The Netherlands is also helping developing countries to increase their resilience to climate change, primarily through water and food security programmes. The resilience of 754,000 farming businesses and 2.4 million people in river basins has been improved.

Result areas

Renewable energy Forests Climate-smart agriculture Climate & Water Climate diplomacy

Featured project climate

Climate-smart agriculture in Uganda

This film shows how our embassy in Uganda is helping farmers - both men and women - to deal with climate change in better ways. These include:

(1) supplying seeds that are resistant to drought

(2) the use of agricultural methods more suited to changing conditions

(3) growing more and different crops

(4) creating more diverse sources of income

(5) the use of energy-efficient milk coolers and solar energy.

Renewable energy

Sven Torfinn

Access to renewable energy

To halt climate change, the world needs to accelerate the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Moreover, one billion people in developing countries do not yet have electricity and three billion people cook in traditional, polluting ways, with negative consequences for their health.

The Netherlands is investing in access to renewable energy for 50 million people between 2015 and 2030. During this reporting period, the Netherlands reached 2.6 million people with solar energy, biogas and better cooking appliances. The total number since 2015 is 7.2 million people, so we are on track.

The solar energy programmes in particular are doing better than expected. The market for solar energy is growing rapidly, especially in East Africa. The Netherlands is providing extra funding to develop the market for solar energy in the Sahel.

Open result area

Sven Torfinn

Results

Indicator

Access to renewable energy

Progress

On track

2.6 million people were reached with access to renewable energy in this reporting period. This brings the total since 2015 to 7.2 million people.

Cumulative result compared to target for the period 2015-2030; see previous report

Indicator

CO2 emissions avoided per year

Progress

On track

3.1 million tonnes of CO2 per year

Renewable energy projects supported by the Netherlands result in total emissions being reduced by 3.1 million tonnes of CO2 per year.

This data does not include the results of the multilateral climate funds to which the Netherlands contributes, such as the Green Climate Fund, because the data were not yet available.

United Nations: SDG7 calls for acceleration

United Nations: SDG7 calls for acceleration

In 2018, the United Nations analysed the progress made towards the sustainable energy target (SDG7). Renewable energy developments have been promising but need to be further accelerated to meet the 2030 targets.

There is still too little progress on sustainable energy for heating, cooling and transport. It is particularly worrying that 3 billion people still cook on polluting cookers and open fires, resulting in major health damage. Projects for clean cookers cannot keep up with population growth. The UN is therefore calling for clean cooking to be made a political priority.

The UN SDG7 page

Read more on the progress made on SDG7

Lighting Africa: solar energy for the poorest

With a small solar energy system, a household in rural Africa can have access to electricity, even if the nearest electricity grid is very far away. With Dutch support, a commercial market in Africa has been developed for these products. Households can buy the systems in the shop and will not be dependent on continuous support. The World Bank Group has already succeeded in reaching more than 30 million people using this strategy.

The World Bank Group’s Lighting Africa page

Read more about Lighting Africa

Forests

In Indonesia, 50,000 trees are being planted with the help of a palm oil company. This will connect two important forest areas, in which orang-utans live. Illegal logging and palm oil plantations have caused severe deforestation in this region. Photo: IDH

Combating deforestation

Deforestation exacerbates climate change, because it strongly reduces the storage of greenhouse gases. One major cause is changed land use due to commercial farming. Another is poverty among the population in forest rich areas, where people cut down trees to sustain their livelihoods.

Forests and trees help people and ecosystems to mitigate the negative effects of climate change. The Netherlands invests in combating deforestation and in preserving and restoring valuable forestland.

The Netherlands works with governments in developing countries to tackle deforestation structurally. The Netherlands supports them in formulating and implementing policies and laws that combat deforestation, such as improving spatial planning. We also work with companies and small farmers in forest rich areas to increase agricultural production and protect or restore the forests at the same time.

Open result area

In Indonesia, 50,000 trees are being planted with the help of a palm oil company. This will connect two important forest areas, in which orang-utans live. Illegal logging and palm oil plantations have caused severe deforestation in this region. Photo: IDH

Results

Indicator

Hectares of forest under sustainable management or other practices that contribute to reduced deforestation, storage of more greenhouse gases or greater resilience of ecosystems and people.

Progress

On track

In this reporting period, 1,198,534 hectares were brought under sustainable management or their management was strengthened.

The number of hectares is cumulative because the protection and restoration of forests is an ongoing multi-year process. Over the years, some programmes have been completed, notably in 2016.

The Netherlands invests in the protection and restoration of valuable carbon-rich forests and in supporting local communities and small farmers in heavily forested regions. The objective is to increase resilience to the negative effects of climate change.

An IDH (Sustainable Trade Initiative) programme has made progress in regions with high levels of deforestation in Indonesia, Brazil, Vietnam, Kenya, Liberia, Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana. It has improved collaboration between the governments and key companies in these regions to reduce deforestation. Building on companies' commitments to stop deforestation, we are achieving results in the production of palm oil, soy, meat, cocoa and tropical hardwood, among others.

For example, clear agreements have been made between governments, businesses and local communities on the protection and restoration of forests and the monitoring of these agreements. A reforestation project in Ethiopia has also informed the local population about new sources of income, such as the cultivation of fruit.

The reporting period spans from September 2017 to September 2018

Indicator

Public and private policies, plans, commitments and practices adopted and/or implemented

Progress

Not applicable

Contributed to the better management and condition of forests through governance programmes

Together with governments in developing countries, the Netherlands has contributed to the better management and condition of forests through governance programmes, for instance through improving policies or legal frameworks. In doing so, we are capitalising on political opportunities and involving civil society organisations to combat illegal logging.

The programmes for better governance also take advantage of the opportunities offered by the market. For example, the Netherlands supports an EU programme in which the European Commission makes agreements with governments in developing countries to improve their forest management in exchange for easy market access to the EU.

Indonesia was the first to complete all of the steps and has issued more than 39,000 EU export licences worth more than €1 billion since November 2016. Countries in other regions of the Congo Basin and Southeast Asia have also made progress. Important elements of the agreements, such as compliance monitoring systems, have been used in other major processes to combat climate change, such as those of the World Bank.

Indicator

Number of people supported through programmes for better practices in forest management and improved livelihoods

Progress

Not applicable

55,738 people were supported in this reporting period.

Among other things, the Netherlands supports local farming communities in developing new sources of income, so they no longer need to cut down forest to make a living. In this way, Tropenbos International has achieved results with small producers and indigenous peoples in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Ghana, Indonesia and Suriname.

In Indonesia, for example, Tropenbos has supported the establishment of a successful women-led mushroom farm. This is combined with a tree nursery to restore an important forest area within the local palm oil plantations. The palm oil company, for which the women's husbands work, has provided financial support to the mushroom and tree nursery. This successful project is inspiring other villages to set up similar projects with the support of the local government.

The reporting period runs from September 2017 to September 2018.

IDH's Initiative for Sustainable Landscapes (ISLA) project in Western Kalimantan (Indonesia)

IDH is working on the protection of 120,000 hectares of valuable forests, the restoration of 10,000 hectares of degraded forests and the preservation of palm oil production on 43,000 hectares in western Kalimantan.

Initiative for Sustainable Landscapes

Read more about the initiative here

Climate-smart agriculture

Climate-smart agriculture. Source: IDH, Elske Stevenson

Climate-smart agriculture

Small farmers in developing countries are vulnerable to the consequences of climate change. Unpredictable weather conditions, droughts and floods threaten farmers' agricultural yields and limit the availability of affordable food to local consumers. For this reason, the Netherlands is helping small farmers to adapt to the consequences of climate change through its food security programmes. Support focuses on better collection of rainwater and improved agricultural techniques, for example, as well as development of seeds that are better able to withstand drought and better weather information.

The results are presented under the Food Security theme.

Food Security theme

The results for this result area are presented on the Food Security page

Climate-smart agriculture. Source: IDH, Elske Stevenson

Climate & Water

Photo: Carel de Groot

Climate-resilient use and management of water

Climate change has major consequences in the field of water. In some places, the risk of flooding is increasing due to rising sea levels, more meltwater from the mountains or heavier rainfall. Elsewhere, climate change is leading to drought and lack of water. In other places, salinisation of groundwater and surface water is a major problem. Through its water programmes, the Netherlands ensures that people are less vulnerable to these consequences.

The results are displayed under the Water theme.

Water Theme

The results for this results area are presented on the Water page

Photo: Carel de Groot

Climate diplomacy

Minister Sigrid Kaag at the Nationally Determined Contributions Partnership

Climate diplomacy

In the Paris Climate Agreement, countries agreed to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius and preferably 1.5 degrees. Countries are not yet doing enough to achieve this goal. Through diplomacy, the Netherlands aims to ensure that other countries also do more to combat climate change.

The Netherlands also wants countries to report clearly on the measures they are taking. At the Climate Summit in Poland at the end of 2018, the Netherlands and other countries ensured that clear agreements were reached on how we would hold each other accountable for limiting climate change. In 2019 and 2020, countries must present their plans for the coming years to limit global warming.

Letter to parliament on the results of COP24

Letter to parliament on the outcome of the UN climate summit in Poland in December 2018 (COP24)

Letter to parliament on expectations for COP24

Letter to parliament on the expectations of the UN Climate Summit in Katowice in December 2018 (COP24)

Video on the Netherlands' contribution to COP24

Video with English subtitles on Dutch efforts and participation in the UN Climate Summit in Poland in December 2018 (COP24)

Minister Sigrid Kaag at the Nationally Determined Contributions Partnership

Photo: Sven Torfinn

Background information theme climate

Background

In this results report, the Netherlands reports on the results it has achieved through its climate finance and diplomatic efforts. Climate finance is more than the budget for climate in the Foreign Trade and Development Co-operation (BHOS) budget. Other budget items also contribute to climate action in developing countries. Appendix 6 of the Homogeneous Group International Co-operation (HGIS) Annual Report 2018 provides an overview of Dutch climate finance. The amount stated here is the public climate finance provided by the Netherlands in 2018.

Glimpse into the future

The effects of climate change are increasingly felt throughout the world. The Rutte III Cabinet has resolved to place greater emphasis on combating climate change and adapting to its consequences.

By means of a diplomatic campaign, the Netherlands aims to persuade other countries to do (even) more to limit climate change.

Through additional funding for climate action in developing countries, the Netherlands aims to better support the poorest and most vulnerable people. Many of these extra resources will be deployed through the new Dutch Fund on Climate and Development, which is being set up in 2019.

The Netherlands will continue to focus on those areas in which its knowledge, expertise and role in the world can make the biggest difference, such as access to renewable energy, combating deforestation, climate-smart agriculture and climate-resistantlient use and management of water. In doing so, the Netherlands will continue to work with multilateral organisations, NGOs, knowledge institutes and the business community.

In 2019 and 2020, Minister Kaag will co-chair the international NDC Partnership. This partnership focuses on supporting developing countries in making and implementing better climate plans.

Additional sources

Letter to parliament on NL Fund for Climate + Development (DFCD)

Letter to parliament on the context, objectives, conditions and structure of the Dutch Fund for Climate and Development

Climate and Development theme page on government website

Page on current policy within the Climate theme

Facebook page NL Global Issues

Follow the climate theme on the Inclusive Green Growth Department Facebook page

Inclusive Green Growth Department Twitter account

Follow the climate theme via the Inclusive Green Growth Department Twitter account

Expenditure by channel

Expenditure