Highlighted results

Improved food intake for 11.4 million people

Increased productivity and income for 1.2 million family farms

More eco-friendly use of 670,000 hectares of land

Land tenure security for 110,000 people

Improved position in agriculture for 113,000 women

Additional sources

Policy document

Read the Policy document on food and nutrition security

Theory of ChangeTheory of Change

Download Theory of Change PDF document, including Food security

Introduction

The Netherlands’ food and nutrition security policy contributes to the objectives of SDG 2: eliminating malnutrition, doubling the productivity and income of small-scale farmers (both women and men) and making food production systems more sustainable. The problem is urgent, as world hunger has increased again in recent years. The Netherlands has formulated a realistic contribution to SDG 2 and translated it into three long-term goals that we wish to achieve by 2030:

Lifting 32 million people out of undernourishment, especially children. Doubling the productivity and income of 8 million family farms.Converting 7.5 million hectares of existing agricultural land to more sustainable use

In addition to activities that target these goals directly, we are also working on a better enabling environment for food security. This includes knowledge and capacity, private-sector development, land tenure security, the position of women, and the interplay with other sectors and themes. This report will also present a number of results related to these topics.

Results 2018

The results show that the efforts deployed to achieve the goals set are generally sufficient. Enough malnourished people and family farms are being reached to achieve the goals set by the Netherlands in 2030. Only the amount of agricultural land converted to sustainable use remains too low. We also see demonstrably positive effects in fields such as improved nutrient intake, productivity, market access, management of natural resources and resilience to shocks. In many cases, the sustainability of these effects in the long term cannot be determined yet. We aim to get a better picture in the future, in order to show our contribution to the global objectives for 2030 (eliminating malnutrition, doubling the productivity and income of family farms, and conversion of land tomore sustainable use). Further methodology development is required to measure these long-term effects.

The report also highlights three factors contributing to a better enabling environment for food security: establishingland tenure security, a strong position for women and improved knowledge and innovation. The results indicate that substantial contributions have also been made in these fields.

Result areas

Malnutrition Agriculture Sustainable land use Enabling environment

Featured project food and nutrition security

2SCALE

2SCALE develops public-private partnerships for inclusive business in the agri-food sector in eight African countries. 2SCALE provides support to inclusive agribusiness entrepreneurs (SMEs and farmers' organisations) to make them better at producing healthy food products for local markets. The program is funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with co-financing from the private sector and implemented by IFDC, SNV and BoPInc. The most important objective is to reach 750,000 small-scale farmers (at least 50% women) and one million low-income consumers. For example, 2SCALE in Kenya worked with Ruth Kinoti, founder of Shalem Investments, on a new business model that has doubled the number of farmers supplying the company while sharply increasing their productivity. She has also joined forces with 2SCALE to launch the affordable and healthy food product Asili Plus.

Image: Maize farmers in the SONAF partnership in Mali

2SCALE
The website of the 2SCALE programme

Read more about the 2SCALE programme and partnerships on the website

Malnutrition

Contribution to the elimination of malnutrition in 2030

The Netherlands aims to put an end to the malnutrition of 32 million people between now and 2030. This will require improving food intake, access to healthy and diverse food and making people’s nutritional situation more resilient to shocks. In the reporting period, 18.5 million people, especially children, were reached directly through food-related activities supported by the Netherlands. Within this group, the largest results were achieved on improving food intake. This is the effect of direct administration of dietary supplements, vitamins and therapeutic foods as well as deworming treatments. Structurally better access to food, for example through markets, and resilience to shocks were achieved for a more limited number of people.

Open result area

Over the past year, some 18.5 million people, mainly young children, were reached directly through programmes that contribute to improved food intake, better access to food and making people’s nutritional situation more resilient to shocks. This includes activities such as malnutrition screening, nutritional advice, the administering of nutritional supplements, therapeutic nutrition, extra vitamins and deworming cures, the planting of vegetable gardens and providing access to a more diverse and healthier food. Within the group of 18.5 million people, 11.4 million actually improved their nutrient intake in the short term.

Both the reach and the actual improved nutrient intake were lower than last year: the reach decreased by more than a third while the improved nutrient intake was around 25% lower. The reason for this is that a large UNICEF programme ended mid-year. A new programme has now been started in cooperation with UNICEF.

In the long term, we strive for a sustainably better nutritional situation in which malnutrition is eliminated. This should be achieved for 32 million people by 2030. There has been no report on these targets this year, as the indicator is still being further developed.

Results

Indicator

Number of people (especially children) with better food intake

Progress

On track

What does this indicator mean?

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many people, especially children, have been treated directly for malnutrition. Treatments for malnutrition consist of providing supplementary food, additional vitamins and deworming treatments, or a combination thereof. These interventions improve people’s nutrient intake, which improves health in the short term.

In 2018 in total 18,5 million people were reached. Within this group, it was possible to determine for 11,4 million that their food intake had improved in the short term.

What does this result mean?

The projects supported by the Netherlands in 2018 resulted in a demonstrable improvement in the food intake of more than 11 million people, the majority of whom were children. In 2016, this was achieved for 15.5 million people, which means that the number has decreased by 25%. The reason for this is that a large UNICEF programme ended mid-year. A new programme has now been started in cooperation with UNICEF.

Indicator

Number of people whose access to healthy/diverse food has improved

Progress

Progress, not on track

What does this indicator mean?

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many people have benefited from better local food supplies. This improvement takes place through activities such as the construction of new vegetable gardens or a more diverse range of local stores. Food access can also be improved by giving people help in obtaining food, for example through social programmes.

In 2018 in total 18,5 million people were reached. Within this group, for 500 thousand people their access to healthy and/or diverse food had improved.

In 2018, projects supported by the Netherlands ensured better access to healthy/diverse food for half a million people. This represents a decrease compared to 2016 and 2015: the number was 1.3 million in 2016. This difference can be explained by the fact that a large UNICEF programme ended mid-year.

Indicator

Number of people whose nutritional situation has become more resilient to shocks

Progress

On track

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many people have benefited from improvements in their environment, making them less vulnerable in nutritional terms. People’s nutritional situation is strengthened by building up buffers for periods of shortage, by ensuring drought-resistant water and sanitary facilities and by improving health and hygiene.

In 2018 in total 18,5 million people were reached. Within this group, the nutritional situation of 3 million people has become more resilient to shocks and stresses.

In 2018, projects supported by the Netherlands ensured a more stable nutritional situation for more than three million people. This is almost three times as many as in 2016. The explanation for this increase is a UNICEF project that scored high on this indicator in its final phase.

Developing Human Capital in Rwanda

Developing Human Capital in Rwanda

The aim of the five-year project Developing Human Capital is to prevent children from becoming malnourished. The project is being implemented by UNICEF in partnership with local partners in 14 districts throughout Rwanda. It deploys an integrated approach, focusing on multiple causes of malnutrition. An essential aspect of this approach is the Early Childhood Development Centres, which offer services such as childcare. They also disseminate information on the importance of good nutrition to the local population. In addition, they are closely linked to health centres in the region so that children are well monitored for signs of malnutrition. Furthermore, there is a focus on improving water and sanitation, household hygiene and education. This programme has improved the nutrient intake of 1.5 million children.

Image: Day care centres have been set up around tea plantations to care for children while their mothers are at work. This ensures proper nutrition and school lessons for the children. Credits: UNICEF

Netherlands Working Group on international Nutrition (NWGN)

The NWGN is a Dutch platform for civil society organisations, knowledge institutes, private companies and governments active worldwide in the field of nutrition.

Agriculture

Flour from the maize harvest is dried (Malawi). Credit: T. Samson, CIMMYT

Contribution to doubling the productivity and income of family farms in 2030

The Netherlands aims to help double the productivity and incomes of eight million family farms by 2030. The projects supported by the Netherlands focus on agricultural growth in order to bring an end to rural poverty. Work is also being done on improving market access and making farms more resilient to shocks. Some 3.7 million farms were reached during the reporting period. Improved access to markets was seen most often. A large number of farms also increased their productivity and income and/or improved their resilience to shocks. The ultimate goal of doubling productivity and income was demonstrably achieved by 51,000 farms.

Open result area

Flour from the maize harvest is dried (Malawi). Credit: T. Samson, CIMMYT

In the past year, 3.7 million family farms benefited directly from programmes that contribute to increasing productivity and incomes, improving access to markets and increasing resilience to shocks. These family farms, in which several members of the family are involved, produce on a small scale. The support took the shape of services such as advice, improved fertilisers and seeds, and better financial services and infrastructure. There are no precise figures, but most likely more men than women were reached.

Among the beneficiaries, 2.5 million farmers received better access to markets, 1.2 million improved their productivity and income, and 754,000 improved their resilience to shocks. The latter two figures are approximately one third lower than the previous year, due to a programme in East Africa performing below expectations because of capacity limitations at local government level. A new programme, in which several supply chain stakeholders are involved, has yet to catch speed.

In the long term, we strive for a sustainable doubling of productivity and income, so that farmers – both men and women – and their families escape rural poverty for good. This should be realised for eight million beneficiaries by 2030. Some 51,000 farms have been reached so far, with the caveat that the relevant indicator was only introduced this year.

Results

Indicator

Number of family farms that have doubled their productivity and income in the long term

Progress

Progress, not on track

What does this indicator mean?

To make a realistic contribution to the SDGs, the Netherlands aims to help at least eight million farmers to double their productivity and income by 2030. This ties in directly with SDG objective 2.3. To assess progress, a record is kept of how many farmers have demonstrably reached the goal. It is important that the doubling of productivity and income is not a one-off situation but has a permanent character.

In 2018 in total 3,7 million smallholder family farms have been reached. Within this group it could be demonstrated for 51,000 farmers that their income and/or productivity had doubled in the long term.

What does this result mean?

Productivity and income have doubled for 51,000 farms. This is just a modest start on the total of eight million farms for which this should be achieved by 2030. The indicator was measured for the first time this year. More results are expected in the coming years.

Indicator

Number of family farms whose productivity and/or income has increased in the short term

Progress

On track

What does this indicator mean?

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many farmers have demonstrably improved their productivity and/or income. This is achieved through training, advice and technological and organisational support. Improvements in infrastructure, agricultural materials and access to financial services also contribute.

In 2018 in total 3,7 million smallholder family farms have been reached. For 1,2 million farmers out of this group it was demonstrated that their productivity and/or income has increased.

What does this result mean?

With the help of projects supported by the Netherlands, 1.2 million farmers were able to increase their productivity and income in 2018. This is 700,000 fewer than in 2016. The difference is due to a programme in East Africa that underperformed due to restrictions at the local government level. A new programme, which involve several stakeholders, has yet to be started.

Indicator

Number of farmers with improved access to input and/or output markets

Progress

On track

What does this indicator mean?

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many farmers have improved access market to input or output markets. This is achieved by adapting infrastructure, developing food supply chains or strengthening organised purchasing and sales.

In 2018 in total 3,7 million smallholder family farms have been reached. 2.5 Million farmers out of this group have improved access to input and/or output markets.

What does this result mean?

The projects supported by the Netherlands contribute to better market access for 2.5 million farmers. This is almost one million more than 2016. The increase was made possible by several relatively new activities that are reporting on this indicator for the first time.

Indicator

Number of family farms that have become more resilient to stress and shocks

Progress

On track

What does this indicator mean?

Climate change is placing additional pressure on farms. Temperature rises, heavy rainfall, drought and new pests are all causing poorer harvests. To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many farmers have become more resilient to this type of shocks. The methods used to achieve the target consist of climate-smart techniques, such as planting drought-resistant crops, drip irrigation and heat-resistant storage facilities.

In 2018 in total 3,7 million smallholder family farms have been reached. 754,000 farmers out of this group have become more resilient to stresses and shocks.

What does this result mean?

Projects supported by the Netherlands have helped 750,000 farms to demonstrably improve their resilience to shocks. This number is considerably lower than that achieved in 2016, largely due to a programme in East Africa performing below expectations due to restrictions at the local government level. A new programme, which involve several stakeholders, has yet to catch speed.

Char Development and Settlement Project (CDSP IV)

The Char Development and Settlement Project (CDSP IV) in Bangladesh aims to improve the economic situation and living conditions of communities on the islands off the country’s south-eastern coast. It adopts an integrated approach that focuses on water, agriculture and climate to provide farmers with the technical assistance required to make more sustainable use of their land. In addition, many farming families have been granted land ownership rights. Half of these were provided to women to strengthen their position within the community. This project has helped many farmers to increase their productivity and income, and much agricultural land is now used in a more sustainable way.

Date on CDSP IV

Read more about the Char Development and Settlement Project on the website

AgriProFocus

AgriProFocus is a network that brings together farmers, agribusiness, civil society , knowledge institutes and governments, and strives to provide a combination of development work and agribusiness support. The Netherlands supports this network.

CGIAR

CGIAR brings together organisations involved in research for a food secure future. The Netherlands is one of the donors to CGIAR.

Sustainable land use

Number of hectares of agricultural land used in a sustainable way

The Netherlands is striving to support conversion of at least 7.5 million hectares of land to sustainable use by 2030. The projects supported by the Netherlands focus on smarter use of natural resources, improved landscape and river basin management, and making agricultural land more resilient to shocks. During the reporting period, one million hectares of land benefited from the relevant projects. Of these, 670,000 hectares are currently being used in a more eco-friendly way. There has been less progress in improving landscape and river basin management and making agricultural land more resilient to shocks, and more work must be done on this in the coming years. The ultimate goal of conversion to sustainable use was achieved on 24,000 hectares.

Open result area

One million hectares of agricultural land have benefited from the programmes over the past year. Methods such as integrated soil fertility management, agroforestry, crop rotation and improved water management were used to improve the sustainable use of the land. More eco-friendly use could be achieved on 670,000 hectares, continuing the upward trend of recent years. The results relating to improved land and water management and making land more resilient to shocks are lagging behind, however, and will require more attention in the coming years.

The number of hectares of land that have actually been converted to sustainable use, one of the final objectives of SDG 2, has been established at 24,000 for this reporting period. Given that the total reachis one million hectares, this is still on the low side. It should be noted that reporting on this indicator was only introduced this year, however, and the indicator and related reporting standards will be further developed over the coming year.

Results

Indicator

Number of hectares of agricultural land converted to sustainable use

Progress

Progress, not on track

What does this indicator mean?

To make a realistic contribution to the SDGs, the Netherlands aims to contribute to making the use of at least 7.5 million hectares of land sustainable by 2030. This ties in directly with SDG objective 2.4. Progress is monitored by keeping track of the amount of land for which this has demonstrably been achieved.

In 2018 in total 1 million hectares of agricultural land was reached. For 24,000 hectares it was possible to determine that the land has been converted to sustainable use.

What does this result mean?

Sustainable use has been established for 24,000 hectares of land. This is a modest start given that the ultimate goal to which the Netherlands aims to contribute is 7.5 million hectares in 2030. The indicator was measured for the first time this year, however, and more results are expected in the coming years.

Indicator

Number of hectares of agricultural land used in a more eco-friendly way

Progress

On track

What does this indicator mean?

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many hectares of agricultural land are cultivated using methods that use natural resources in a smarter way than conventional farming. This means that soil, water and fertilisers are used in a more efficient way.

In 2018 in total 1 million hectares of agricultural land was reached. For 670,000 hectares it was possible to determine that the land is now used in a more eco-friendly way.

What does this result mean?

Projects supported by the Netherlands have led to 670,000 hectares of agricultural land being used in a more eco-friendly way. This result means that the upward trend from 2015 to 2016 has continued in 2018.

Indicator

Number of hectares of agricultural land on which the management of the natural environment has improved

Progress

Progress, not on track

What does this indicator mean?

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many hectares of agricultural land have seen improved management of the natural environment. This applies to areas such as river basins, landscapes and grazing grounds.

In 2018 in total 1 million hectares of agricultural land was reached. For 11,000 hectares the land management of the natural environment has improved.

What does this result mean?

Projects supported by the Netherlands have enabled better management of the natural environment on 11,000 hectares around agricultural areas. This is only 10% of the result achieved in the previous year. The reason for this is the termination of a programme in Ghana that contributed by far the largest proportion of the previous year’s result.

Indicator

Number of hectares of agricultural land that has become more resilient to stress and shocks

Progress

Progress, not on track

What does this indicator mean?

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many hectares of agricultural land have been made more resilient to shocks. This is measured by looking at the methods used to grow food, such as alternating crops, agroforestry, rainwater collection and integrated soil fertility management, which contribute to making agricultural land more sustainable.

In 2018 in total 1 million hectares of agricultural land were reached. For 95,000 hectares of land it was possible to determine it has become more resilient to shocks and stresses.

What does this result mean?

Projects supported by the Netherlands have helped make 95,000 hectares of agricultural land more resilient to shocks. This is half as much as the previous year, due to a programme in Uganda which reported significantly lower results in 2018. This is at odds with the fact that the effects of climate change are worsening. More will have to be achieved on this indicator in the future.

Geodata for Agriculture and Water (G4AW)

Small-scale farmers in Uganda are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the risks associated with climate change. SUM-Africa, which is supported by the Netherlands Space Office (NSO), has developed an innovative micro-insurance product based on geodata that protects these farmers against climate risks. The video shows Margret at work on her land. She is now insured against a failed harvest and explains how this has positively affected her life.

The Dutch programme G4AW uses satellite data to improve food security in developing countries. The Netherlands Space Office (NSO) implements this programme on behalf of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. G4AW started in 2013 and now comprises 23 projects organised through public-private partnerships in 14 countries in Asia and Africa.

The goal is to reach 4.5 million small-scale farmers by 2022. Achieving this will require value-chain actors to create new market opportunities and scalable solutions around G4AW services. By communicating about the results of the projects, the programme aims to appeal to both public and private stakeholders (foreign investors, governments, development banks and insurance companies) to meet farmers’ needs and counter their limitations. The aim is to offer access to G4AW services and to scale up the services.

The Geodata website for Agriculture and Water

Read more about G4AW and the projects in the various countries here

Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme (ASAP) – IFAD

ASAP is one of IFAD’s largest programmes in the field of climate finance for small farms. The Netherlands is one of the donors that contribute to this programme.

Enabling environment

A group of women in Dedougou, Burkina Faso, look at the results of the participatory mapping study in which they have just taken part. Credit: Manon Koningstein

Better enabling environment for food and nutrition security

A better enabling environment makes an indirect contribution to achieving the final objectives of SDG 2. The Netherlands has decided on three priority areas within the enabling environment:
land tenure securityimproved knowledge of and access to technology for farmers a stronger position for women in agriculture While no target values have been set for these three enabling environments, positive results have been achieved.

Open result area

A group of women in Dedougou, Burkina Faso, look at the results of the participatory mapping study in which they have just taken part. Credit: Manon Koningstein

An enabling environment is very important for achieving the SDG 2 end goals. There are a range of factors that together creating a strong enabling environment, ranging from stronger national institutions to improved access to knowledge for small farms. Within this large number of options, the Netherlands has chosen three focus points that are a good fit for its policies.

The first focus point is to guarantee land tenure security, which are essential to guarantee the security of investments by farmers, and in particular female farmers, thus creating more long-term security.

The second focus point is access to knowledge and technologies, or innovation. Tailored training and advice that suits the context in which farmers work is of great importance for increased productivity, for instance. This also applies to research and the development of innovations. To reinforce the second enabling environment, the Netherlands supports organisations involved in research, education and training worldwide.

Third focus area is gender-equality, a cross-cutting priority in Dutch development policy that is important within the full range of themes related to food security. Efforts focus mainly on strengthening the position of women (empowerment) in agriculture and food supply chains.

Results

Indicator

Number of farm holders that obtained land tenure security

Progress

Not applicable

107,000 farmers

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many farmers – both men and women – have obtained a formal title or other right that guarantees access to land. This enables safe investment and improves farmers’ chances of achieving a stable income.

What does this result mean?

Guaranteed land tenure security is essential for sustainable development and secure investment in agriculture. Projects supported by the Netherlands have helped 107,000 people obtain land tenure security. Due to programmes expiring, this number is lower than in previous years. A new programme will be launched in the summer of 2019, which will focus in particular on land tenure security for women as a result area. The Netherlands also supports a range of relevant international networks in this area, which disseminate experiences and knowledge.

Indicator

Number of farmers equipped with new knowledge, technologies and/or skills

Progress

Not applicable

502,000 farmers equipped new knowledge, technologies and/or skills

What does this indicator mean?

To assess progress, the Netherlands keeps track of how many small-scale farms are equipped with new knowledge, technologies and/or skills. This access is achieved through measures such as training, advice or new methods or technology. We also look at the number of innovations developed based on research.

What does this result mean?

Improved knowledge and technologies are essential for the development of farms. In 2017, Dutch support helped 502,000 farmers to get access to new knowledge, technologies, skills or a combination of these. In addition, 128 innovations have been developed based on relevant research.

Indicator

Number of empowered women in food and nutrition security

Progress

Not applicable

What does this indicator mean?

Gender is a priority of Dutch development policy. There are a range of projects that target women in agricultural and food interventions. The starting point should be that at least half of the total number of farmers reached (3.7 million) are women. Next, there is the question of the extent to which the position of the women reached has been improved. This is measured based on the Women Empowerment in Agriculture Index or a related methodology.

This year, 514,000 women benefited from food and nutrition security interventions. 113,000 women are empowered via these interventions. This is an acceptable result as this indicator was only introduced this year and has not yet been applied to all activities. The number of women reached is expected to increase when the indicator is applied more widely.

Securing Women’s Land Tenure in Africa: Scaling Impact in Senegal, Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique

Securing Women’s Land Tenure in Africa: Scaling Impact in Senegal, Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique

The research program on Securing Women's Land tenure in Africa is active in Kenya, Mozambique, Malawi and Senegal. The research identifies successful initiatives aimed at promoting and extending women's access to agricultural land. It focuses on women's voice and vision, actively involving them in data collection and thus increasing their role in discussions. Several experts in the field of land tenure rights for women have been brought together in the project, including the female champions, local leaders, academics and development workers. The contact among the experts involved in the various initiatives in the four countries has improved and enhanced the impact of the local initiatives.

[em]image credits:Thierno Sall (Enda Pronat)[/e]

Securing Women's Land Tenure in Africa

The study of land tenure security for women in Kenya, Mozambique, Malawi and Senegal was conducted by LANDac and funded by the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. All the results of this research can be found on this website.

Food & Business Knowledge Platform

The Food & Business Knowledge Platform aims to bring together stakeholders from different sectors that are active in the agriculture and food sectors. The platform bundles and disseminates their knowledge, contributing to improved policy and practices in

LANDac

LANDac is the Dutch academy for land tenure security. The academy brings together networks, disseminates information and conducts research into land-related conflicts and inequalities in the field of land tenure security.

Background information theme food and nutrition security

Background

The report shows the progress of Dutch efforts towards the objectives of SDG 2 regarding both short-term effects and long-term outcomes. There are two important things to note in this regard:

1. It is a challenge to accurately assess, measure and enumerate effects and outcomes. The aggregated results represent an indication and should not be interpreted as exact reflections of reality.

2. In addition to the figures presented here, there are many specific results that cannot be aggregated. Some results are difficult to quantify or cannot be quantitatively expressed at all. The results presented here therefore do not provide a complete picture.

The Policy evaluation by the Policy and Operations Evaluation Department (IOB) of the efforts on behalf of food security 2012-2016, published last year, provides more details on the effectiveness of our actions. The evaluation recommends increasing synergy both within the efforts on behalf of food security and with adjacent themes. Another recommendation is to use a food system approach centred on nutrition.

Glimpse into the future

In the context of realising the Netherlands’ intended contribution to the SDG 2 targets within the current financial period and enacting a shift to new focus regions (Sahel, Horn of Africa, Middle East and North Africa), two things are worth mentioning:

1.There will be a shift to programmes that work on more sustainable use of agricultural land. This is expected to lead to the realisation of more results related to the SDG 2 target on sustainable food production systems.

2. There will be more attention for the measuring of effects, in particular in the long term. By creating greater clarity about the method of reporting on long-term effects, we expect to achieve more results in this regard.

Additional sources

Food security theme page on the Dutch government website

You can read more about Dutch policy on global food and nutrition security here

NL Global Issues

Learn about our work on Facebook

Video on how the Netherlands tackles the food challenge for 2030

This video explains how the Netherlands and its partners are tackling the food challenge for 2030

Sustainable Development Goal 2: Zero Hunger

The Netherlands is helping to achieve SDG 2. This page provides an overview of all SDG 2 objectives and worldwide progress

Expenditure by channel

Expenditure